Mash Efficiency Calculator

A mash efficiency calculator is a valuable tool for a brewer, especially if you’re brewing all-grain beers, as it helps you determine how efficient you are at extracting the sugars from your grain during the mashing process, thus helping you minimize waste, maximize the use of ingredients and ensure product consistency.

To determine the mash efficiency using our calculator, you only need to know:

  • the wort volume (make sure you choose the right unit – in Settings);
  • the specific gravity (measure it after the wort has cooled, but before you pitch the yeast);
  • and the mass for each type of grain you’re using. It can, of course, be just one type of grain, two or more (again, make sure you choose the right unit – in Settings).

As for the grain points or PPG value, if you do not have the precise value for each type of grain from your supplier, we have included a malt PPG chart below for some common brewing grains.

Finally, if you’re unsure about anything, just drop us an email at [email protected] and we’ll be happy to assist you.

MASH EFFICIENCY CALCULATOR

Batch Data

Wort Volume is required

Gravity is required

Gravity must be between 1.000 and 1.200 SG

Gravity must be between 0.1 and 50 °P

Grains

Mass for first grain is required

Grain Points for first grain are required

Settings


You’ll receive the results via email in this format:

Interpreting the results

A good mash efficiency can vary depending on several factors. For instance, the target mash efficiency may depend on the style of beer you’re brewing – high-alcohol barley wines may benefit from higher efficiencies, while other types of beer may not necessarily require such high efficiency.

However, as a rule of thumb, most experienced homebrewers will aim for efficiency in the 70% and 80% range, while commercial breweries will aim for even higher efficiencies, often in the 75% to 85% range or even higher, ensuring, this way, that they’re maximizing the use of ingredients and minimizing waste.

So…

A higher efficiency percentage means you managed to extract more sugars from your grains, resulting in a more efficient use of ingredients. This can lead to higher alcohol content and a drier finish in your beer.

A lower efficiency percentage suggests that you extracted fewer sugars from the grains, potentially resulting in a lower alcohol content beer, with a sweeter finish.

Finally, here is a Malt PPG* Chart for the most common types of grains:

  • 2-Row Pale Malt: Typically has a PPG of around 36-38.
  • 6-Row Pale Malt: Usually has a PPG of around 35-37.
  • Pilsner Malt: Typically has a PPG of around 36-38.
  • Maris Otter Pale Malt: Generally has a PPG of around 38-40.
  • Vienna Malt: Typically has a PPG of around 35-37.
  • Munich Malt: Usually has a PPG of around 34-36.
  • Crystal/Caramel Malt (20L): Typically has a PPG of around 34-36.
  • Crystal/Caramel Malt (40L): Generally has a PPG of around 33-35.
  • Crystal/Caramel Malt (60L): Usually has a PPG of around 32-34.
  • Crystal/Caramel Malt (80L): Typically has a PPG of around 31-33.
  • Crystal/Caramel Malt (120L): Typically has a PPG of around 30-32.
  • Chocolate Malt: Generally has a PPG of around 28-32.
  • Black Patent Malt: Typically has a PPG of around 25-29.
  • Roasted Barley: Usually has a PPG of around 25-29.
  • Flaked Corn (Maize): Typically has a PPG of around 35-37.
  • Flaked Rice: Generally has a PPG of around 30-32.
  • Flaked Barley: Typically has a PPG of around 30-32.
  • Flaked Oats: Usually has a PPG of around 30-32.
  • Wheat Malt: Typically has a PPG of around 35-37.
  • Rye Malt: Generally has a PPG of around 28-32.
  • Special B Malt: Typically has a PPG of around 32-34.
  • Melanoidin Malt: Generally has a PPG of around 32-34.
  • Aromatic Malt: Usually has a PPG of around 36-38.
  • Biscuit Malt: Typically has a PPG of around 35-37.
  • Honey Malt: Generally has a PPG of around 30-32.
  • Carafoam/Cara-Pils: Typically has a PPG of around 32-34.
  • Flaked Wheat: Usually has a PPG of around 35-37.
  • Torrified Wheat: Typically has a PPG of around 35-37.
  • Red Wheat: Generally has a PPG of around 35-37.
  • White Wheat: Typically has a PPG of around 35-37.
  • Spelt Malt: Usually has a PPG of around 35-37.
  • Rice Hulls (used as an adjunct to improve lautering): Typically has a PPG of around 0-1 (as it’s mostly cellulose and doesn’t contribute fermentable sugars).

Please note that these values can vary slightly based on the maltster and the specific batch of malt, so it’s always a good idea to check with the manufacturer or supplier for precise PPG values.

*PPG stands for “Points per Pound per Gallon,” and it is a measurement used to estimate the potential extract (sugar content) that different grains or malt extracts can contribute to the wort.

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